9 Interesting Facts

Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
The tradition of brides wearing white comes from the marriage of Anne of Brittany to Louis XII of France in 1499, when she wore a white dress to show she was so rich she could afford to wear a dress for only a few hours (back then, white clothing did not remain white for very long). Crissy looked at many a white dress, but couldn't bring herself to buy a gown that she wouldn't be able to wear again. So they had her purple and gold dress and Sean's matching vest designed and made just for them, and they hope to use them for many years at fancy balls and parties.
Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
Brides used to be captured and held hostage until her family called off the search. The term "honeymoon" comes from the time that followed the capture. The bride and groom would hide for 28 days (one full moon cycle) and drink mead (honey based wine). Instead of toasting with champagne (which neither of us is fond of), we choose to toast with mead, a favorite of ours thanks to countless Renaissance fairs. Since it is made with fermented honey instead of fermented grapes, it is particularly sweet.
Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
Obtaining anything that belongs to a bride on her wedding day means you might be as lucky as the bride and groom in love. It didn't take long for this tradition to degrade into attacking the bride for her possessions. So the tossing of the bouquet and garters, and giving of favors (originally small colored ribbons), was started as a means of self-preservation. Instead of tossing items at people, Crissy is using a Victorian tradition called a "ribbon pull." Sterling silver charms for each of the bridesmaids and the two mothers are hidden under the wedding cake. Before we cut the cake, the ladies will gather and each will pull out a ribbon, and the charm at the end of the ribbon holds the promise of her future. The money bag represents wealth, the plane represents travel and adventure, the diary represents dreams coming true, the 4 leaf clover represents good luck, and the treasure chest represents new talents to be discovered.
Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
Origami cranes are common at Japanese weddings. Cranes mate for life and are devoted to their partners in all seasons, and are one of the few birds that work together to build their nest. Throughout Asia, the crane is a symbol of peace, happiness and eternal youth. Sean has folded many origami shapes during his life, and our garden setting seemed well-suited for origami centerpieces. Making one giant crane (out of wrapping paper) rather than the traditional 1,000 cranes was Crissy's addition to the project.
Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
Each item in the "something old, something new" poem represents a good-luck. "Something old" symbolizes continuity with the couple's family and the past. "Something new" means optimism and hope for their new life ahead. "Something borrowed" is usually an item from a happily married friend or family member, whose good fortune in marriage is supposed to carry over. In ancient Rome, brides wore "Something blue" to symbolize love, modesty, and fidelity. Sean's Superman cufflinks were won in a trivia contest at the last wedding we attended. We think this should symbolize luck, as the items were a prize, and symbolize fun, as they were a part of a game. Plus, they are partly blue.
Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
The tradition of the wedding cake comes from hundreds of years ago, when guests would bring wheat cakes to the wedding to symbolize fertility. It became a custom to have the couple attempt to kiss over the pile of cakes - to do so without knocking of the pile would bring prosperity. Eventually this evolved into have miniature bride and groom figurines kissing on top of the cake. The cake design we have chosen shows our love for games and fun. Yes, there is only one way to make it all the way to the top! And the figurines decorating the cake came from Sean's late grandfather's extensive chess collection.
Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
The custom of a "First Dance" harkens back to ancient times when the "Bride Kidnapper" would show off his "hunting" skills by parading his "stolen" bride around, in front of his warrior friends, so they could see how well he had done. The feasting would begin immediately after this display. We choose "Funky Town" as our first dance as it has been "our song" for many years. It dates back to the mid 1990's, when Crissy was trying to find a job in northern California to be closer to Sean and "to make a move to a town that's right for me..."
Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
The circular shape of the wedding band has symbolized unending love for thousands of years. Ancient Egyptians used rings made of hemp or rushes, and the Romans improved the durability by making the rings out of metal. The ring is placed on the third finger of the left hand because they believed that one vein from that finger runs straight to your heart. We had a hard time finding rings we really loved. It wasn't until just a few months ago that Sean hit upon the idea of incorporating a wave pattern. The rings we exchange today will evolve in the future, as will our relationship. The next addition for the rings will be a purple enamel.
Wedding FactCrissy and Sean's wedding
The bridal bouquet originated from the bride carrying strong herbs and spices (like garlic and chives) "to ward off evil spirits". Of course, that is a polite way of saying "to mask bad hygiene." The Romans turned this tradition into carrying flowers. When Sean proposed on January 10th, 2002, he presented the engagement ring in a hand-carved wooden puzzle box that Crissy had been coveting (unbeknownst to him). Instead of a bouquet of flowers, Crissy is carrying that box down the aisle. This time it contains their wedding rings.